Tokyo Takeover: Bird Land

Bird Land is a Michelin starred yakitori joint that only serves chicken skewers.

Yes, you read that correctly.

It seems impossible that eight courses of chicken could be delicious and not intensely boring but I'm not one to argue (much) with the Guide Michelin and I was looking for a tasting menu that wouldn't be too seafood heavy which can be pretty tricky in Japan. Lara looked at me a bit incredulously when I told her I had made reservations somewhere focused entirely on chicken but even without seafood there were still parts of the menu to push her (and me) slightly out of the comfort zones.

Chicken Skewer Birdland, Tokyo, Japan

I'll admit, even though I like the idea of nose to tail dining, our first course was a little hard. Gizzard in gelee and skin that was more chewy than crispy wasn't quite what I was immediately prepared for. Lara had agreed to trying liver courses before the meal started but after the server noticed she hadn't finished her gizzard, he checked in again and she changed her mind. I imagine this happens often with foreigners less accustomed to eating innards than is the norm in this part of the world.

The next course for me was an extremely buttery small block of chicken liver pate and toast. I love chicken liver mousse and this was probably one of the richest I've ever tasted without being overwhelming, I even convinced Lara to eat some and while I still haven't quite won her over to pate, even she had to admit it was exceptionally creamy.

Our first skewer came with, still a bit pink in the middle with dabs of a basil heavy herb mix. As simple as it seemed, the flavors were complex and the chicken was excellent. Later in the evening we saw an American couple across the kitchen sending back their skewers because they weren't cooked enough. Just eat them slightly pink in the middle, it's delicious and I think if a Michelin starred restaurant were giving people salmonella, we'd hear about it.

Chicken Skewer with Fresh Wasabi. Birdland, Tokyo, Japan

"Are they making real wasabi?!" Lara asked me, watching the cooks grate and pinch.

"It looks like it"

Our skewer is once again deceptively simple in appearance.

"I thought I didn't like wasabi but it turns out I don't like American dyed horseradish, this is delicious!"

I nod my head in agreement. Fresh wasabi on everything please.

At the beginning of the evening, I certainly could not have predicted that possibly my favorite course would be a silky smooth house made tofu drizzled with a grassy olive oil and garnished with cracked black pepper and the world's smallest yet most flavorful tomato. I have no idea how so much flavor was packed into a tomato smaller than a penny but what initially seemed like a ludicrously small fruit for this play on caprese turned out to be just enough.

After this I get a whole skewer of livers and even though I love chicken liver mousse and the livers on this skewer are, like the mousse earlier, quite mild and buttery, by the time I'm finished I've reached my limit on liver for the evening.

For Lara, the liver courses are replaced with other chicken pieces you can order from the a la carte menu that aren't on the tasting menu. Some of them are bigger hits than others which is also true of our other skewers at this point in the meal. We have chicken oysters (a cut often abandoned with the spine), mushrooms, sansho sprinkled thighs and even cheese grilled right on the skewer that leaves us trying not to make a gigantic stretchy cheese covered mess as we bite it off. The chicken is always delicious and medium rare but some dishes have us reaching for the togarashi more than others (which maybe is the point). It seems like it will never end but eventually there's a break.

Before dessert our server asks if we'd like to order anything else and we briefly debate ordering another round of wasabi skewers but eight skewers and a few other courses later, we're actually pretty full. For desserts we order one each of the two puddings. Lara's flan is slightly overcooked but otherwise enjoyable. My rose and pistachio rice pudding is completely different than I expected, having a more western rice pudding or sweet porridge in mind. Instead it's completely smooth and firmer than the tofu we had had earlier. I assume it was made of rice starch and was almost like eating a mochi custard or a room temperature version of Turkish dondurma. It is fantastic.

There are of course plenty of cheaper places to get mountains of (much weirder) skewers in Tokyo but if you're looking for grilled meat somewhere that can be a little more accessible to foreigners than your typical smoke filled yakitori joint, I think Bird Land is a great option. The longer tasting menu costs 8,400JPY (approx US$75) and you will leave more full of chicken than you ever thought possible.

Bird Land Ginza is located at Japan, 〒104-0061 Tokyo, Chuo, Ginza, 4 Chome, 2−15 塚本 素 山 ビル B1F‎ (inside Ginza Station next to Sukiyabashi Jiro). You can find out more information and make reservations through their website.

Taipei Takeover: Top Picks for Eating Your Way Through

If you've read about our street food lunch in Jiufen or saw my post about one of our favorite breakfasts, you might've gathered that our eating in Taiwan was mostly pretty casual. I did originally have one fine dining reservation but I had to cancel when we experienced some delays getting our new, giant passports back and shifted the days of our trip. I was a little disappointed initially, but we ate so well that I quickly forgot about it all together (plus, it gave us more money for checking out some of Taipei's cocktail bars and craft beers). Here's what we had.

Din Tai Fung

For our first meal we decided to just commit and really tourist it up by going to Din Tai Fung, the Taiwanese chain that brought Shanghai Soup Dumplings (Xiao Long Bao) to the world. The original location in Taipei holds a Michelin Star but we decided to combine our mountain of soup dumplings with our trip to Taipei 101 and went to the location in the basement food court. The counters above the check in desk were showing a wait time of 45 minutes for two people when we arrived (leading me to go grab a bubble tea for a quick blood sugar boost) but we really only waited thirty minutes and it was totally worth it. We started with dry sauteed string beans (my favorite always), followed by the regular pork XLB, the crab roe and pork XLB, the shrimp and pork shao mai, pork bao and veggie dumplings. Unless you're a vegetarian, I recommend skipping the veggie dumplings. Dan was also not that impressed with his shrimp shao mai. The XLB lived up to the hype and if we were to go again we'd probably just double down on the regular pork. We finished our meal with two mini black sesame buns which I absolutely loved. This was probably our second most expensive meal in Taipei and it still only set us back around $30 (US) for the two of us. If you didn't skip lunch because you were on the plane, and ordered a reasonable amount of food, it would probably be a bit cheaper.

There are locations all over Taipei but this Din Tai Fung is located at 110, Taiwan, Taipei City, Xinyi District, City Hall Rd, 45號台北101購物中心 (basement foodcourt of Taipei 101)

小魏川菜餐廳 (Xiao Wei Sichuan)

This is the kind of place where you might have that momentary traveler's panic of "ooops, what did I get myself into". This Sichuan restaurant may not look like much and if you've never had the Chinatown experience of eating in a giant room where the mode of conversation between the servers sounds like angry shouting (over the tables of happy Chinese families and friend groups also shouting), than it might be a bit overwhelming. I don't think any of the staff speaks English, so you'll need to be prepared to bring your miming A game for getting seated BUT there is a version of the menu with both English and Chinese so ordering isn't too stressful. Since it was just the two of us, we whittled it down to three of our all time faves, dry sauteed string beans (yes, again, always), twice cooked pork and mapo tofu. The green beans here were outstanding, a lot of crispy ginger, spring onion and maybe pork grumbles all throughout and when we had eaten all the beans we were both scooping whatever seasoning was left onto our rice bowls. Our twice cooked pork was good but a little light on spice and Sichuan peppercorns, we're not sure if that's just how they do it or if we got white peopled* because the mapo tofu had quite a bit of heat (and was perfectly silky). If you are looking for Sichuan food OR are just the type of traveler that likes going where you're not going to see any other tourists, this is definitely the place for you.

*A common problem that happens outside of the US where you order spicy dishes and they automatically get toned down, even when you insist you really want the heat.

Xiao Wei Sichuan is located at 100, Taiwan, Taipei City, Zhongzheng District, Gongyuan Rd, 13號3樓, there's no English signage so be prepared to put your character matching skills for the test. It's located on the third floor.

    永康牛肉麵 (Yongkang Beef Noodles)

    You can't go to Taiwan and not eat beef noodles, it's an absolute must. I've read reviews mentioning long lines at Yongkang but there weren't any when we went on a drizzly week night. Even if there had been, a bit of a wait would still have been worth it. Like the Sichuan restaurant, this place is pretty bare bones in service and decor but I'm not really one to be picky as long as the food is good. The menu here has pictures and some English and I went with the spicy soy beef noodles while Dan went for the regular beef noodles. Both had tender, fall apart braised beef and rich flavorful broths. We each preferred the soup we had ordered so you can't really go wrong, it's just a matter of what you're in the mood for. After a day spent exploring in chilly weather, it was just the thing to hit the spot.

    Yongkang Beef Noodles is located at No. 17, Lane 31, Section 2, Jinshan S Rd, Da’an District, Taipei City, Taiwan 106. The also have a website but it doesn't have any English.

    上引水产 (Addiction Aquatic Development)

    Our most expensive meal, this place was both very good and pretty darn weird. Part fish market, part gourmet grocer, part wine bar and part sushi restaurant, this is definitely a unique experience. The first step is definitely to get on the waitlist and get your number for the large standing-only sushi bar. This is accomplished by finding the cordoned off entrance to the sushi bar and being a bit aggressive about getting a server's attention to put you on the list, otherwise somebody will definitely push in front of you to get on the list faster. Once you're on the list, you can explore the gourmet grocer section (and if you don't want to wait, instead grab one of the many many boxes of sushi to go) or grab a drink at the wine bar. The gourmet grocery section was very exciting to us because the selection of things like cured meat and cheeses seemed absolutely insane compared to Seoul (I bought some aged goat cheese to smuggle back into the country and I had zero regrets). Also there were small cups of salmon roe for about a $1.00 (US) and I considered buying one and taking it like a shot while we were waiting.

    Once we got our spot at the sushi bar we learned that there is no English language menu despite being heavily frequented by tourists and a very patient server graciously asked us about different types of fish and made some suggestions. It's possible we ended up with more food than we would have had we ordered on our own but we devoured ALL of it without ending up too stuffed. The quality of all the fish was excellent and the caramelization on our BBQ salmon steak was beautiful but still left it medium rare on the inside. This mountain of high quality fishes plus beers, cost around $45 (US) and I'm not sure you can get better price per quality anywhere in the world. (I'm not saying you can't get better sushi in Tokyo, just that it's going to set you back a bit more).

    Addiction Aquatic Development is located at No. 18, Alley 2, Lane 410, Minzu E Rd, Zhongshan District, Taipei City, Taiwan 104, the also have a website.

      阜杭豆漿 (Fuhang Soy Milk)

      Fuhang Soy Milk is on just about every list of top picks for Taipei and was recommended to us by friends. If you (like us) don't speak Chinese, this is definitely going to be another "what did I just get myself into" situation. A lot of people recommend getting here early to be at the front of the lines but I recommend showing up late after the breakfast rush if you're going on a weekday. We showed up around 11:15 and the line was part of the way down the stairs (not all the way down the block and to the subway station like some places say) and moved very quickly. We were probably only in line for fifteen minutes. Once you get to the front of the line, madness happens. Everyone else around you will be shouting orders rapidly and the older women serving you don't have a lot of patience for your ignorance.

      The first question will be salty or sweet which refers to your big bowl of housemade soy milk. We went with two bowls of sweet which are plopped on a tray which you'll slide down to more food choices. Now is your time to just aggressively point at whatever catches your fancy or whatever the next woman holds up. This isn't really a time to say no to anything because you don't want to be that guy holding up the line. Pay. Find a place to sit. We ended up with two salty chinese doughnuts, our soymilk and an egg sandwich with sesame bread fresh out of the kiln. The soymilk here is rich and delicious and very filling, we had some regrets about not ordering one sweet and one savory but we were caught up in the moment. The doughnuts are fresh and crispy on the outside while airy on the inside. The egg sandwich is the star as far as I'm concerned. The bread is both sweet and sesame-y and the scrambled scallion eggs inside are perfectly seasoned. Take a look around you to see all the ways you can eat these things. I saw doughnuts inside egg sandwiches, egg sandwiches being dipped in the soymilk and just people slurping down there big bowls of savory soymilk. It seems pretty much anything goes.

      Fuhang Soymilk is located at No. 108, Section 1, Zhongxiao E Rd, Zhongzheng District, Taipei City, Taiwan 100 on the second floor. If you find the end of a long line, you're probably there.

      Basil, Sesame Oil Chicken and Chili Ice Cream from Snow King in Taipei

      雪王冰淇淋 (Snow King)

      You didn't really expect me to do a review with out at least one ice cream, did you? Snow King has more flavors than you could possibly imagine, from standards like strawberry or chocolate chip to more unusual fruit flavors like litchi or guava to alcoholic flavors like Kao Liang Wine (listed on the menu as 58% alcohol) to a million nut flavors to the crazy savory assortment we got. We started with scoops of basil and sesame oil chicken. We were warned that the sesame oil chicken had quite a strong flavor and pieces of frozen chicken in it, but that didn't deter us. We weren't at a place with 70 ice cream flavors to get vanilla. When our ice cream arrived, the server suggested we eat the basil first because the chicken would over power it but neither of the flavors were delicate. They were both delicious and became even more delicious when mixed together. However, it seemed like something was missing and it WAS my 30th birthday, so I went up and ordered a scoop of the chili. I got another warning, this time that it was very spicy which only increased my resolve. Another customer chimed in that I was making a good choice. The chili was HOT but it mixed perfectly with the other two flavors. It was a little much for Dan on its own but I was all about it. Ice cream lunch FTW. This place is definitely worth a visit, even if you don't want to go as weird as we did. Maybe you just need a happy hour scoop of Kao Liang Wine?

      Snow King is located at 100, Taiwan, Taipei City, Zhongzheng District, Section 1, Wuchang St, 65號2樓, it's on the second floor up a narrow flight of stairs, we walked by it the first time so keep an eye out.

      Top Choices for Eating your Way Through Taipei

      Top Choices for Eating your Way Through Taipei

      Beijing Break: DaDong Roast Duck

      The first sign that we probably should have changed for dinner was probably the valet stand. The next was when we walked into a huge, pristine and bright entryway with a show kitchen full of ducks roasting and a long bar.

      When Dan had asked if we could go for duck our first night in Beijing, I told him their was a place Lonely Planet recommended a couple of blocks from where we were staying and that it didn't say anything about needing a reservation or having to wait.

      It was Thursday night. We had to wait but only about ten minutes before we were ushered up a staircase that gave a perfect view of the restaurant's light fixtures that were trying to be modern art. Through some hallways and then into another huge room, this one was dim, with glowing light cut outs on the walls and a movie about the restaurant and the chef projected on one wall on loop. After a 5am wake up for our flight and a day spent walking all over Beijing, this club meets fine dining atmosphere is not quite what we're prepared for.

      "Well, at least we're not the worst dressed?" I offered, gesturing to a table of patrons in sweatpants.

      We're seated at a table which we think would be large for the four people for which it's meant and is comically gigantic for the two of us.

      "What do we get?"

      "Well, a whole duck probably. And some vegetable sides?"

      The menu is much larger and includes more fusion than I expected. We settle on a duck with toppings, roast cauliflower with pork belly and a pea dish. Cauliflower and peas are both hard to come by in Korea and prohibitively expensive when you can find them.

      We sit and drink our sparkling water and beer, watching the ducks get carved at the tables around us while the woman in the video sexily eats a braised sea cucumber over and over again.

      Our cauliflower comes out first. We got the smaller portion and it's still pretty substantial. There's no serving spoon. We wait a beat but when no spoon or other dish arrives, after a brief discussion about what's appropriate, we dig in with our own utensils. After all, in Korea, even at Western restaurants, food tends to come out whenever it's done, we're starving and who knows when the next thing is coming?! Just as we've finished serving ourselves, the waiter comes over with a serving spoon and a disapproving glance before he puts our peas on the table. Then the duck cart is rolled over. Oops.

      I still get a couple of bites of cauliflower in while the duck is carved. It's delicious. Gingery and garlicky. Even though the menu had said the cauliflower was roasted, the dish it reminded me of the most was dry sauteed string beans, and immediately begin thinking about how I can recreate this at home once I get my hands on some cauliflower.

      The duck is carved with more speed than my camera can capture. Once there was one plate of it on the table, another server came and began assembling pancakes for each of us. Before he started mine he took a piece of the crisp duck skin, dipped it in coarse sugar, put it on my plate and gestured for me to eat it. I popped it into my mouth. Pure heaven. I watched carefully as he assembled our pancakes, dipping duck into various sauces, folding in different cuts, adding leaks to one and cucumber and melon to another. The wraps he gives us are exquisite. Then we're left on our own to dip and wrap our duck as we see fit.

      Our table which once seemed comically large is now filled with multiple plates of duck, two dishes of duck garnishes, our huge portion of cauliflower, side plates with peas and a steamer basket of pancakes. I find myself half standing when I reach for things on the far side of the table.

      "This duck is delicious but also this cauliflower! How are we supposed to eat the peas?"

      "I don't know," I admit while watching the table next to us also struggle with eating peas with chopsticks.

      The peas were served on a spoon with a hooked handle resting on a plate. In the US I would've assumed we were to pick up the spoon, but I try that and notice something has been used to stick it to the plate. I struggle through, alternating between chopsticks and a fork. The peas are fine, but they're no cauliflower.

      At first I think we've ordered way too much food, but after a few minutes of the kind of silence that only happens when you are both really hungry and the food is really good, a significant amount of our whole duck has disappeared.

      Next a plate of jujubes in some sort of dry ice presentation have to find room on the table, followed by what is maybe a palate cleanser or amuse bouche of very sweet strawberry sorbet. We're still busily working on our duck. I choose to prioritize space in my stomach for cauliflower over the overly sweet sorbet.

      Finally, we are sated. I've watched other tables get their leftovers packed up to go and I'm excited that we'll have such good food for our Great Wall picnic the next day. We manage to get a waiters attention and with some hand gestures indicate that we're ready to pay and be packed up. After the waiter swipes our card, another woman comes over and begins to deftly pack our leftovers into a compartmentalized tupperware. Eventually she gets to the jujubes and asks us something in Chinese. We thinks she's asking if we want them packed so we nod.

      Instead she slices the flesh of one of the jujubes away from the seed and hands it to me. I eat it. Then she does the same for Dan. Then she asks us another question we don't understand that we think is maybe her asking if we like them. So we nod again, thinking now she'll pack them up. But she doesn't. She smiles and walks away leaving the empty bag and the jujubes on the table. We eat a couple more because it seems like the thing to do, but when she doesn't come back, we pack them ourselves and put them with the tupperware in the supplied small, sturdy shopping bag and head home.

      We get back to our room and Dan gets a message from a friend's sister "you should go to DaDong roast duck, but be careful, sometimes they give bad ducks to tourists".

      If that was the bad duck, I think I might actually die from too much deliciousness if I had the good.

       

      (I came pretty close to that anyways, so I'm pretty sure it wasn't a bad duck)

      Beijing's Dumplings: The Good, The Bad and The Cheap

      Where to go and what to avoid

      I love dumplings of pretty much any variety but Korean mandu are, well, a little underwhelming. Since we have a few China trips planned this year, I figured Dim Sum could probably wait for our Hong Kong or Taiwan trip and obviously xiao long bao for Shanghai, but I wasn't going to pass up the opportunity to get in some dumpling meals. All in all we had three different dumpling meals ranging from delicious to... disaster.

      The Good: Duyichu (38 Quinman Street)

      We hit the tail end of the lunchtime rush and didn't have to wait for a table upstairs at Duyichu but the Lonely Planet description of service at Duyichu as "no-frills" is certainly accurate and we did have to wait a while before placing our order. I actually have no idea if there is an English language menu because it seemed like the server in our area really didn't want to deal with us so I used google translate on what seemed to be the shaomai section of the menu (if you're not going to have data while traveling, you're probably just going to go with the tried and true "point and pray" method unless you bring a local). Some of it, of course, translated totally crazy but we were able to figure out what we wanted so when we finally did get a server's attention, we just pointed at the three different things on the menu.

      The shaomai (shumai) I've had at most dim sum places in New York and California aren't usually my favorite. First off, I'm not a shrimp eater and you never really know if they're going to be all pork or have a secret shrimp waiting. Second, I don't know, they just often don't have that great a texture and are kind of boring. These shaomai were nothing like that. The wrappers were delicate and beautiful and the fillings extremely flavorful. The veggie filling which google translate had definitely partially described as "bird home" turned out to be garlicky greens, egg and tofu. Dan insisted on the classic pork and shrimp combination and was quite happy with it. The plain pork dumpling was the winner in my book, it was a gingery, garlicky filling with a bit of liquid in the bottom. Basically like if shaomai and xia long bao had a delicious, delicious baby. Each order of dumplings was eight pieces, and we didn't quiiite finish them all (I think three got left behind) despite the fact that we started out starving. We spent around $30.00 here, including our bottled water, which seemed totally worth it for the quantity and quality of food.

      The Bad: Donghuamen Night Market (Dong An Men Da Jie)

      The Bad: Dumplings from Dong An Men Da Jie (Donghuamen Night Market) Beijing

      Look, I knew Donghuamen was going to be touristy and I figured it would be a little too expensive but who doesn't want to see other tourists eating scorpions on sticks? It was way too expensive, there wasn't that much variety and the things we had were pretty bad. The dumplings pictured above were some sort of beef coriander filling that was ok but the bun was dry and the bottom was hard and tough from sitting. We also got a bowl of garlicky noodles and told the vendor we didn't want her fried dumplings but she threw them on anyway "to try" but she definitely charged us for them. If we had been less hungry maybe we would've been able to deal with the pushy vendors better but it definitely seemed more irritating than fun. If you want the scorpion on a stick experience with less people yelling at you about their not very good food, I'd recommend Wangfujing Snack Street instead.

      The Cheap: Zuo Lin You She (50 Meishuguan Back St)

      These crazy long dumplings were our first meal in Beijing. I knew we were going to hit the ground running and conquer The Forbidden City on our first day but also that our morning flight and then drive to our lodgings meant we were going to be starving so I wanted something fast, cheap and filling. These bad boys don't look like much (and were a bit on the greasy side) but they left me satisfied. Zu Lin You She doesn't have any English signage on the outside, but the menu has all eighteen of the meat fillings and eight of the veggie fillings translated! I don't think any of the workers speak English, so we just drew a line with a chopstick from the English translation to the Chinese and the server entered it into her ordering pad. We went with spicy beef and coriander, pork and summer squash, pork, green pepper and coriander and, pork and cabbage. We also were planning on ordering tofu and mustard greens but the server cut us off with a hand gesture that implied we had already ordered more than enough for two people and she wasn't wrong.

      Dan's favorite turned out to be the spicy beef and coriander he had chosen while mine was the pork, green pepper and coriander. The pork and cabbage was a pretty solid version of a standard gingery, garlic potsticker/fried dumpling filling but the pork and summer squash was a bit on the bland side (I wouldn't order it again). There's chili oil and vinegary soy sauce to mix in your dishes exactly the right size for the dumplings and I recommend slyly watching the other patron's dipping and eating methods since they can be a little hard to handle. This mountain of dumplings cost $6.00. TRUE STORY.

      Parc

      Parc Hannam-dong Seoul

      Parc in Hannam-dong describes itself as "Korean Mother's Recipes and More". I tend to describe park as "modern Korean". But I think maybe the better way to describe Parc would be "Korean slow food". With it's adorably illustrated "know your namul" place mats, changing menu and focus on quality of ingredients it definitely has a Korean meets California Cuisine vibe.

      Parc has a set menu that seems to usually have one seafood and one meat option which comes with rice, banchon and the soup of the day. The current menu is often posted on their Facebook page but only sometimes in English (don't worry, there are English language menus available when you get there). You can also add on sides, but the sides are almost as big as the main dishes so I would recommend splitting one between two or more people since the set menu itself is quite filling (in the above picture we did not follow this advice and ordered one side each which was way too much food but delicious).

      When I went there was an option described as "chicken braised in soy sauce" and a squid option. I went with the chicken option and added a side of japchae (glass noodles and stir fried vegetables) and Ashley got the squid and a side of the jellyfish salad. I chose black rice for my dish and was surprised when my tray came with a pat of butter which the waitress instructed me to place on my rice and let melt a bit before mixing my rice into my bowl with the chicken, sweet potato, soft egg and greens. My unconventional bibimbap was nothing like I expected my dish to be. To be honest, I was really happy because soy sauce braised chicken sounds kind of boring and one note and this dish was anything but. The chicken dish had a mildy sweet soy based sauce with a hint of cinnamon. The addition of fresh greens to the bowl kept it from feeling too wintery and we all know I'm a sucker for anything with an egg on it. Each banchon (small side dish) had a unique taste and overall I would say it was much fresher and much subtler in flavor that most of the Korean cuisine I've had (with the exception of Sanchon).

      My japchae had a lot of vegetable mixed in and was delicious but I barely put a dent in it because the chicken bowl, rice and soup were already a pretty solid amount of food. However, the jellyfish salad was the true star of the sides. Cool jellyfish mixed with cucumber, red peppers and just a touch of wasabi was the Summer salad I didn't know I had been looking for.

      Located next to Leeum, Samsung Museum of Art, Parc is a great choice for a lunch or dinner to add on to a modern art excursion. Or, if like me, you live a seven minute walk away, for anytime you want Korean cuisine with a twist. As well as having lunch every day, they're also one of the few places in the area that serve food until midnight on the weekends (last order 11:00pm).

      Parc is located at 734-1 Hannam-dong, Yongsan-gu, Seoul on a side street between Itaewon-ro and Leeum Museum. Come out Hangajin Station exit 3, walk straight on Itaewon-ro and turn right at the road between the Audi showroom and Trevia restaurant. Continue up the short road and cross the street running perpendicular continuing on the road that's uphill and slightly to the right. Parc will be on your left.